Daffodils from the Florist: The Joy of City Living

One of the reasons I love living in the City, after living in the silent back-end of Suburbia for twenty-five years, is going out after breakfast and making the short walk to the florist to buy daffodils.  It’s this and other conveniences, like the five minutes it takes between getting out of bed and arriving at Starbucks when you have no milk in the fridge for breakfast, that have landed me irrevocably in love with living in the City, and in particular Chester.

Shortly after setting out from the flat, I’m back here at my desk, and there is a beautiful spread of Daffodils next to me, making everything more cheerful.  Flowers can be seen as somewhat of a frivolity, especially when it’s hard enough to find the money to buy food and essentials, particularly for students, but some things are important.  I am currently, to put it bluntly, skint.  It’s a long time until the next student loan instalment, I’m overdue on my rent, and can barely find train fare to get home or buy milk, but for 95p I’ve bought myself a little explosion of morale and encouragement, to sit on my desk and brighten up my day.  Little things like flowers, as extraneous as they may be, make you smile, and your problems don’t seem as bleak.

The sun coming in through the open windows, together with an enlivening breeze, and floral prints on bedding and clothes, make one feel like Spring is really here, and everything that goes with sunshine, bare legs, sandals, picnics, bike rides, beaches and barbeques.  It lifts everything up, and the torpor and stagnation of winter, that you didn’t even realise was weighing you down, is suddenly lifted, and everything feels lighter (in terms of weight, and illumination).

As I typed that last sentence, Music When The Lights Go Out by The Libertines started playing (my itunes is on shuffle).  It’s moments like this, when a beautiful song which means so much to me suddenly appears when I least expect it, that really move me.

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1 Response to “Daffodils from the Florist: The Joy of City Living”


  1. 1 Carroll B. Merriman April 13, 2011 at 10:33 am

    You made some decent points there. I regarded on the internet for the issue and found most people will go along with along with your website.


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Sylvia Plath said; "Let me live, love and say it well in good sentences". My aim in life is to find things and people to love, so that I can write about them. Putting words together is the only thing I can see myself doing. This blog is an outlet, and I hope you enjoy reading it. Please feel free to comment on posts, or contact me by the special e-mail I've set up (vikki.littlemore@live.co.uk) with your thoughts.


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The New Remorse, Oscar Wilde.

The sin was mine; I did not understand.
So now is music prisoned in her cave,
Save where some ebbing desultory wave
Frets with its restless whirls this meagre strand.
And in the withered hollow of this land
Hath Summer dug herself so deep a grave,
That hardly can the leaden willow crave
One silver blossom from keen Winter's hand.

But who is this who cometh by the shore?
(Nay, love, look up and wonder!) Who is this
Who cometh in dyed garments from the South?
It is thy new-found Lord, and he shall kiss
The yet unravished roses of thy mouth,
And I shall weep and worship, as before.

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Music I Love (In no particular order, except that The Smiths are first)

The Smiths,
The Libertines,
The Courteeners,
Nina Simone,
Oasis,
Pete Doherty,
Gossip,
The Kills,
Amy Winehouse,
Arctic Monkeys,
Rod Stewart,
The Doors,
The Rolling Stones,
Etta James,
Babyshambles,
T. Rex,
The Jam,
Morrissey,
Guillemots,
The Kinks,
Jack White,
The Deadweather,
David Bowie,
The Winchesters,
The Cure,
Kaiser Chiefs,
The Kooks,
The Twang,
Kings Of Leon,
Pulp,
Blur,
The Housemartins,
The Ramones,
James,
Robots in Disguise,
The Klaxons,
Kate Nash,
The Raconteurs,
Regina Spektor,
Aretha Franklin,
Stereophonics,
The Contours,
Dirty Pretty Things,
The White Stripes,
New York Dolls,
Yeah Yeah Yeahs,
The Clash,
Style Council,
Velvet Underground,
The Horrors,
The Cribs,
Reverend and The Makers,
The Subways,
The Wombats,
Foals,
Elle S'appelle,
The Troggs,
The Beatles,
Echo and the Bunnymen,
Florence and the Machine.

Olive Cotton, Tea Cup Ballet, 1935

Olive Cotton, Tea Cup Ballet, 1935

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Will it ever be alright for Blighty to have a Queen Camilla?

One less tree from our window each day


Vikki's bookshelf: read

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
1984
Twilight
Of Mice and Men
Pride and Prejudice
The Hobbit
The Da Vinci Code
Lolita
Tipping the Velvet
Wuthering Heights
The Picture of Dorian Grey and Other Works by Oscar Wilde
Bridget Jones's Diary and Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason
Irish Peacock & Scarlet Marquess: The Real Trial of Oscar Wilde
The Peculiar Memories of Thomas Penman
Moab Is My Washpot
The Bell Jar
The Other Boleyn Girl
On the Road
Brideshead Revisited
Revolutionary Road



Vikki Littlemore's favorite books »

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